Controversial Study Says Drinking Just THREE Alcoholic Beverages A Week Is Unhealthy

0

Drinking just THREE alcoholic beverages a week is bad for your health, according to a controversial study, warning punters to limit their consumption to just two small glasses of wine – or a pint and a half of beer

  • Drinkers are told to limit themselves to just two small drinks a week
  • Drinking more than three drinks puts you at ‘moderate risk’, new report says
  • The claims are presented in a report by the Canadian Center on Substance Use and Addiction

At first it was 26 glasses of wine a week, then 17, then ten, and the latest UK guidelines have reduced it to six.

Now drinkers are being told to limit themselves to just two small glasses – or a pint and a half of beer – a week to avoid harm to their health, according to the authors of a controversial new report.

And people who drink three drinks a week are at “moderate risk” of alcohol-related health damage, their study found, while those who drink more than six a week are at “moderate risk” increasingly high risk.

The new claims come from a report by the Canadian Center on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA), funded by the Canadian government. And its ‘small drinks’ are undersized by British standards – equivalent to a 125ml glass of wine or three-quarters of a pint of beer.

Last night Dr Richard Harding, who helped revise sensible drinking messages for the UK government in the mid-1990s, denounced the report.

He argued that the claim that drinking only three drinks a week was detrimental to health “was not supported by medical evidence – in fact, quite the contrary”.

Now drinkers are being told to limit themselves to just two small glasses – or a pint and a half of beer – a week to avoid harm to their health, by the authors of a controversial new report (stock image)

“Fifty years of epidemiological and clinical research point to substantial health benefits – not harms – of daily consumption of small amounts of alcohol,” he said. “The fact is that if people followed the recommendation to reduce their drinking to two small drinks or less per week, they are likely to be worse off in terms of health.”

Christopher Snowdon, of the Institute of Economic Affairs think tank, said: ‘A limit of two drinks a week is so ridiculously low that it will be met with derision by the public.

Both of these studies have consistently found that overall death rates are lower among those who drink small amounts of alcohol, compared to abstainers.

If the CCSA’s ‘two-drink rule’ were adopted in Britain, it would mean dividing our current recommended maximum of 14 British units of alcohol per week for men and women – around six pints of beer – down to around 3 .5 units, about a pint and a half.

People who drink three glasses a week expose themselves to a

People who drink three drinks a week are at “moderate risk” of alcohol-related health damage, their study found, while those who drink more than six a week are at “moderate risk”. higher and higher” (stock image)

Britain’s recommendations are stricter than Canada’s, partly because they were updated more recently. Canada’s, set in 2011, does not exceed 25 British units per week for men and 17 for women.

The CCSA argues that current alcohol guidelines tend to be based on “risk thresholds” that are much higher than those considered acceptable for other voluntary activities, such as smoking or having unprotected sex. .

His report is the latest in a succession of public health experts around the world to take a much harder line on low-level alcohol consumption.

But critics say these often ignore the evidence of potential benefits for light drinkers.

In January, the charity World Heart Federation was accused of “seriously misrepresenting” evidence to bolster its argument that drinking even small amounts of alcohol is bad for the heart.

Mr Snowden said the reports were part of “a concerted effort by anti-alcohol academics to reduce drinking guidelines”. The goal is ultimately to get them down to zero so they can argue that there is “no safe level” of alcohol consumption.

Advertising

Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.